What are the differences between Dual Member Proportional (DMP) and Mixed Member Proportional (MMP)?

If you want lots of detail, we recommend checking out the great videos and other resources found at https://peipr.ca/dmp-mmp/.

You can also see the overview, videos and detailed explanations on Election PEI's website: www.yourchoicepei.ca (in the 'Options' and 'FAQ' sections.)

If you want just the top-level explanation of the differences, here's a summary table! 

Mixed Member Proportional Representation

Dual Member Proportional Representation

18 local districts, each with 1 MLA, plus 9 province-wide seats. (Total of 27)

13 or 14 local districts, each with 2 MLAs. (Total of 26 or 28)

Parties nominate one candidate per district, as well as an 'open' list of candidates for voters to choose from, for the 9 province-wide seats.

Lists are recognized as a tool that can help a party to nominate more diverse candidates.

Independent candidates (not part of any political party) can run in local districts, and not for the province-wide seats.

Parties nominate one candidate, or two candidates (primary & secondary) per district.

Independent candidates can run in all districts.

Voting:

You have two votes:

  • 1 vote for a candidate in your local district, just like the current system

  • 1 vote for a candidate from your preferred party, for the province-wide seats. This vote counts for both the candidate and the party.

 

Voting:

You mark a single X, just like you do now, for a candidate in your local district. 

Your vote counts for both the candidate and their party.

The most popular candidate in a local district will always be elected to that district's seat.

The 9 'top up' provincial seats are awarded to the most popular candidates from list of the parties who are under-represented at the district level, to ensure an overall proportional balance in the legislature.

If a party deserves 3 top-up seats, they will be awarded to that party's 3 most popular candidates.

Parties do not get to control which people sit in the legislature: that decision is made entirely by the voters.

The most popular candidate in a local district is always elected, to the first of a district's two seats. The second seats per district are then awarded, to give a proportional balance in the legislature.

The system then aims to award each party's deserved second seats in the districts where they had their most popular remaining candidates, based on the percentage of votes received in each district.

Independents who place second in any district will always be elected to that district's second seat.

Parties do not get to control which people sit in the legislature: that decision is made entirely by the voters.

You could take your concerns to your local MLA, or to any of the 9 province-wide MLAs.

You can take your concerns to either of your two local MLAs, who would likely be from different parties.

Commonly used around the world, eg in Scotland, Wales, New Zealand and Germany.

This is a new system, designed in Canada.

 

If you want a Proportional Representation system, vote for these two options as your 1st and 2nd choices, in whatever order you choose. It's up to you to choose which option deserves your number '1'.

If you can't make up your mind, don't let it stop you from voting - toss a coin if you have to!

Your vote will have the most impact if you number BOTH Proportional Representation options as your top TWO choices.

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  • published this page in FAQ 2016-10-27 12:19:29 -0300